Disney Rumors

Disney spokesperson Andrea Finger declined to comment, but she passed along a statement that Dr. Pamela Hymel, Disney Parks’ Chief Medical Officer posted June 18 on the company’s website. Hymel outlined the various protocols Disney will take, including temperature checks for guests, increased cleaning and disinfecting, social distancing, required face coverings and options for contact-less payments. Hymel added, “as we prepare for the reopening of our destinations, this is a responsibility we take very seriously.” “I support people’s rights to express that point of view. We have members that have the opposite point of view and everywhere in between,” said Jeremy Haicken, president of UNITE HERE Local 737, the union which represents workers in Walt Disney World Food & Beverage and Housekeeping. “The bigger question is Florida has a completely broken unemployment system where workers are faced with this choice to starve or go back to work in a dangerous environment. About 30% of our members have not received a penny in unemployment in ten weeks. It is absolutely criminal that workers are being forced to choose between starving and going back to work in this environment.”
Health officials offered mostly rave reviews about the NBA’s 113-page health and safety protocols, both for its preparation and depth. Yet, some health officials and those in NBA circles wondered why Disney employees would not be subject to quarantine procedures as NBA players, coaches and staff members are required. “I don’t think any reasonable person would say that was a real possibility. You’re talking about hundreds, maybe thousands, of workers in these hotels that would never see their family for three months,” Clinton said. “These are a mix of single parents, mixed families, joint families, all with kids. They’re all very diverse. They are immigrants and people of color. There is absolutely no way someone should expect a housekeeper who makes $15 an hour not to see her children for however long this is going to go on.”
They will have other responsibilities, too. When teams begin their quarantine between July 7 and 11, Disney employees will arrange for meal delivery to be placed outside each person’s room. They will clean and disinfect training and practice equipment in between uses after a team leaves the area. While teams will be responsible for their own laundry, Disney employees will clean the hotel linens. Disney will also staff take-out restaurants with the same employees to eliminate staff turnover. They will all be required to wear masks and gloves, while staying at least six feet apart. Said Clinton: “They’re going to be scheduled and trained in a way not to interact with the players as much as possible.”
Storyline: Orlando Bubble
Regardless, the NBA said in its health and safety protocols that the league, players union and Disney “will continue to monitor the ongoing coronavirus situation, including as local, state and national public health recommendations evolve, new or different technologies become available (e.g., related to diagnostic testing or contact tracing), and emerging evidence continues to inform best practices for prevention, control, and mitigation strategies.” “We are continuing to work with Disney on the testing of at least a subset of their employees that could potentially be in the same room with our players and anyone else who’s tested daily on our campus,” Silver said. “So we are satisfied that once we work through those additional measures with Disney, we will continue to have a safe setting for us to resume our season.”
“Regular” testing will continue in Orlando during Phase 3 (July 1 to July 9-11), increased in Phase 4 (July 9-11 to July 21) and be in place through the Restart Phase (July 30 to the last possible end date of Oct. 13). The NBA will create the “League Health Platform” to register test results and monitor symptoms, temperatures and other screenings for everyone in the campus. Each campus member will be provided a “Smart Thermometer,” which will record the individual’s temperature into the League Health Platform. The NBA will also supply each campus member with a pulse oximeter to take blood oxygen saturation levels on a daily basis and record in the League Health Platform.
Teams are encouraged to bring a mental health professional (it can be the team clinician) with their travel party. If they choose not to, teams must make telehealth appointments available, particularly if “any player experiences increased feelings of anxiety and stress upon transitioning to the campus and being away from household family members.” As teams advance in the playoffs, they will be allowed to add and swap out members of the travel party. Teams can add two staffers after advancing past the first round of the playoffs and two more after the conference semifinals. That is something multiple coaches pushed the league to adopt, sources told ESPN.
Storyline: Coronavirus
Andrew Greif: Per NBA’s health protocols: Though team members must remain at home, self-quarantining from June 23-30, there are exceptions — visiting team facility, groceries, etc. Another, timely, exception? The rules do not prohibit players and essential staff from engaging in protests. The NBA’s protocols state that teams are to invite the individuals who want to take part in protests to consult with a team physician about best practices at avoid COVID-19 while doing so. And to be clear, June 23-30 is phase 2 of the NBA plan. They are also permitted to attend protests right now, during phase 1, as well.
Storyline: Coronavirus
Conditioning, Brown says, is the key to success in a resumed season. “A fitness base is everything,” Brown said. Brown would like his team to be at a B-plus by the time they leave for Orlando, and work their way up from there. Mentally, there are different challenges. “A real fear is the question of if guys want to be there,” Brown said. “None of us can dismiss that—it’s human nature. Coming out of a pandemic, to assume everyone will be gung ho about going would be very naïve.”

Dwight Howard agrees with Kyrie Irving that NBA should cancel season

Howard’s agent gave a statement confirming the 15-year veteran’s position to Jill Martin of CNN, and within it Howard explained his position, saying that as much as he wants to win his first title, he has bigger goals in mind than basketball achievements right now: “I agree with Kyrie (Irving). Basketball, or entertainment period, isn’t needed at this moment, and will only be a distraction. Sure it might not distract us the players, but we have resources at hand majority of our community don’t have. And the smallest distraction for them, can start a trickle down effect that may never stop. Especially with the way the climate is now. I would love nothing more than to win my very first NBA Championship. But the unity of My People would be an even bigger Championship, that’s just too beautiful to pass up. What better time than now for us to be focusing on our families?
“This is a rare opportunity that, I believe, we as a community should be taking full advantage of. When have we ever had this amount of time to sit and be with our families? This is where our Unity starts. At home! With Family!! European Colonization stripped us of our rich history, and we have yet to sit down and figure us out. The less distractions, the more we can put into action into rediscovering ourselves. Nations come out of families. Black/African American is not a Nation or Nationality. It’s time Our Families became their own Nations. No Basketball till we get things resolved.”
Storyline: Coronavirus
Irving, along Carmelo Anthony, Dwight Howard and Donovan Mitchell, expressed their desire not to play at this juncture, sources said. Portland Trail Blazers star C.J. McCollum shared that he voted “no” on resuming the season in a group chat, but he stressed the importance of finishing the season out of fear the next CBA negotiations wouldn’t be so kind to the players, sources said. Howard said the time is now to take a stand and to use their collective power to implement change in the justice system and how police treat people of color instead of playing, sources said.
Where do things stand right now with talks the NBA and NBPA are having? Danny Green: “It’s very up in the air right now. There are still a lot of moving parts. We’re trying to figure that out. We have 80 percent knowledge of how Orlando is going to be. There are still moving parts to figure out, which teams are going to stay where, how they’re going to do it and how they’re operating in the bubble. Right now, the bubble doesn’t seem as effective as they would like or as lenient as we would like. We’ll have to figure it out.”

Top young players seek NBA insurance

On the cusp of hundreds of millions of dollars in contract extensions, several of the NBA’s top young stars had a Friday call with National Basketball Players Association officials about the possibility of league-financed insurance policies to protect against career-threatening injuries in the bubble restart in Orlando, sources tell ESPN. Miami’s Bam Adebayo, Sacramento’s De’Aaron Fox, the Los Angeles Lakers’ Kyle Kuzma, Utah’s Donovan Mitchell and Boston’s Jayson Tatum — five players with significant star and earning power — talked with executive director Michele Roberts and senior counsel Ron Klempner about the NBPA facilitating talks with the league on possible insurance allowances for players, sources said.
This rumor is part of a storyline: 1020 more rumors
The NBPA and NBA have engaged on the possibility of protections for players in the event of serious COVID-19 illnesses or career-threatening injuries suffered in Orlando, sources told ESPN. The union and league are still negotiating details on the revised terms to the collective bargaining agreement before the 22-team restart. Together, Adebayo, Fox, Kuzma, Mitchell and Tatum have hoped the collective voice of such a starry group of elite young talent could shape the league’s thinking on sharing in the risk on insurance not only for them, but a broader swath of players returning to the season’s restart in Orlando, sources said.
“I think they might very well be quite successful with it,” Fauci told Stadium. “They really wanted to make sure that the safety of the players was paramount. “I actually have looked at that plan. … What they are really trying to do is to create a situation where it is as safe as it possibly could be for the players by creating this bubble. Essentially testing everybody, make sure that you start with a baseline of everybody being negative and trying to make sure that there is no influx into that cohort of individuals and do a tournament-type play.”
Storyline: Coronavirus
“It’s not the classic basketball season, but certainly for the people who are thirsting for basketball (and) who love basketball the way I do, it’s something that I think is a sound plan,” Fauci said. “I was very pleased to see that the intent was not reckless at all. They really wanted to make sure that the safety of the players and the people associated with the players was paramount. So I think that you might be able to do something like that with basketball. Could you extrapolate that to some of the other sports possibly? I think they should look at that model, see how it works, and then take it from there. Maybe modifications of that for some of the other sports.”
Adrian Wojnarowski: Sources: Joining the 16 current playoff teams in Orlando: New Orleans, Portland, Phoenix, Sacramento and San Antonio in the West and Washington in the East. If the 9th seed is more than 4 games behind the 8th, No. 8 makes playoffs; Fewer than 4 games, a play-in tournament.
Near the end of the NBA’s Board of Governors call on Friday, Oklahoma City Thunder owner Clay Bennett delivered an impassioned soliloquy on why the league and owners needed to consider the competitive and financial plights of smaller market teams that could be left out of the season’s summer resumption in Orlando — and the potential symbolic power of all 30 teams gathering there to play as one united association. As the NBA moves toward a plan of inviting 22 teams re-start a truncated season in late July, sources told ESPN, Bennett spoke of exhausting ways to accommodate non-playoff teams still wanting to play. He wondered: was there a way to safely bring all 30 teams?
Storyline: Season Resuming?
For those teams left out of the playoffs, there has already been dialogue on the possibility of mandatory summer training camps and regional fall leagues of four-to-five teams that could bridge the lengthy gap between seasons, sources told ESPN. Those are ideas many teams consider vital, and there’s an expectation that the NBA will raise possible scenarios such as these with the Players Association, sources said. “The message was something bigger, reminding people that some teams can’t just re-open the doors in nine of 10 months and so easily sell tickets or a sponsorship without having played basketball for that long,” one high-level Eastern Conference official on the call told ESPN.
If the NBA ends up settling on the 22-team format, at least some of the remaining eight teams will push for some form of training camp over the summer, sources said. Franchises fear being apart from their players for as long as eight or nine months. Like so much of what comes next, the concept of a formal summer camp places the NBA in uncharted territory. Intruding into what are typically offseason months for players would require some bargaining with the players association, sources said. And what about players entering free agency when the offseason begins – which could extend as far as mid-October?