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Donnie Nelson Rumors

When Chandler Parsons was a member of the Dallas Mavericks, he reportedly played a key role in personnel decisions in consultation with Mark Cuban. Parsons joined the Mavericks in 2014 on a three-year, $46 million contract. “Donnie Nelson ultimately won a power struggle after Chandler Parsons was the primary voice in Cuban’s ear for a couple of year,” said Tim MacMahon on the Brian Windhorst Podcast. “Chandler Parsons had significantly more control over personnel than Donnie Nelson did for two years. That is simply a fact.”
Storyline: Dallas Mavericks Turmoil?
Curiously, Voulgaris took credit for a couple of developments on which he should have held his tongue. He said relations between him and Donnie corroded to the point in 2020 that Donnie got up and left the Mavs’ draft room when Bob walked in. Now in charge, as Bob put it, he pressed for a trade to acquire Tyrese Haliburton, who went 12th to Sacramento. No deal transpired, so the Mavs took Josh Green with the 18th pick when conventional wisdom had it that Villanova’s Saddiq Bey was the superior option. A source close to the team confirmed that the analytics department was, indeed, behind the choice of Green. Bob loves a good 3-and-D guy more than a full house.
“I wanted to be a part of something. I wanted to win basketball games,” Voulgaris told Pablo Torre on the ESPN Daily podcast. “Changing the organizational structure of the Dallas Mavericks was never something I was interested in unless I was going to be the guy in charge, and I wasn’t even sure. I never actually wanted to be the guy in charge until it became clear that the guy in charge didn’t want me around. And then I was like, ‘Oh, OK, now it’s competitive.’ … “But when it became personal, like then the competitive part of me started to kind of kick in. Like, ‘Oh, this guy wants me out of here.’ It never became obvious that he wanted me out of there. You can just read between the lines a little bit. You can kind of see. Just to be very clear, the first two years or whatever, Donnie was very pleasant around me when I was there. It’s just, you hear certain things, you learn certain things, you’re told certain things. It was a very gossipy workplace, very gossipy. It was like a sewing circle over there.”
Storyline: Dallas Mavericks Turmoil?
“I sent [Cuban] an email where I was like, ‘Hey, look, I’m just trying to fit in. I appreciate the opportunity. I don’t want to ruffle any feathers,'” Voulgaris said. “And he was very clear, like, ‘No, I don’t want you to fit in. We’re deficient in areas that you’re good at. If it’s hard, hard conversations have to be had.’ Looking back on it, it was kind of like I was this missile to go in there and create the change and unlock some boulders that couldn’t be moved before.”
According to Voulgaris, he had very little interaction with Nelson despite technically reporting to him in the organizational structure. Voulgaris communicated directly with Cuban and, more frequently, with Carlisle, whose lineup and rotation decisions were heavily influenced by the data provided by Voulgaris. “I didn’t have a working relationship with other people in the front office at all, to the point where it was awkward,” Voulgaris said. “But that’s kind of the M.O. of the way that front office was run — like, surround yourself with people who are not threats. You don’t become an NBA general manager and hold on to your job for that long unless you are very, very good at keeping your job.”
Voulgaris noted that the Mavericks had not had a front office employee get hired in a more prominent role by another franchise during Nelson’s two-decade tenure as president of basketball operations. Voulgaris attributed that to Nelson not wanting any strong candidates working under him, citing Gersson Rosas’ three-month stint as the Mavs’ GM in 2013 as an example of Nelson eliminating a potential threat.
Storyline: Dallas Mavericks Turmoil?