Gregg Popovich Rumors

“He assimilated with the Pop philosophy,’’ one NBA executive who is close to Udoka told The Post. “Udoka is a person very driven, meticulous, hard on himself. He’s a perfectionist.” Udoka, who oversees the Sixers’ defense, joined another Spurs alum in Brett Brown in Philly. Torrel Harris, the agent for and father of Sixers forward Tobias Harris, has been most impressed with Udoka, a former Knick. If the Bulls’ job officially opens, Udoka is expected to be a frontrunner, especially now that former Sixers executive Marc Eversley just joined Chicago.
ESPN’s Stephen A. Smith was the one to throw the San Antonio Spurs head coach’s name in the mix, but there’s been no word about the idea since. Not until Nets general manager Sean Marks was asked about the possibility on WFAN’s Joe & Evan on Friday: Pop has a job. So I will say that. And, obviously, we all know he’s an amazing, amazing coach — and to be quite frank, an even better leader. So I’ll let Pop continue to coach for the Spurs. He owes it to them and they owe it to him. I’m sure he’s quite happy there.

Nets to make 'godfather offer' to Gregg Popovich?

In an appearance this week on the “Let’s Get Technical” podcast with retired NBA stars Rasheed Wallace and Bonzi Wells, Gerald Brown of SiriusXM NBA Radio noted the presence of rumors linking Popovich to the Brooklyn Nets. The rumors state that Nets owner Joe Tsai is looking to make a “godfather offer” to Popovich for him to come coach the team.

Gregg Popovich. Doris Burke: I adore Gregg. Listen, I don’t like those [courtside] interviews more than anybody else, but I tell a story about Pop that will capture him. He loses Game 7 [of the 2013 NBA Finals]. I’m walking out of Miami Arena, and he’s gonna cross paths with me. I don’t even want to make eye contact with him. I put my head down and I step back and allow him to pass. And he grabs my shoulders and he turns me to him and he says, “Now what are you gonna do with your offseason?” I’m stunned, and I said, “I’m actually gonna make a trip to Napa.” He goes, “Doris, here’s my secretary’s email. You send her a note, tell her what you’re doing.” He sent me an email back with a list of places I should go. That captures Gregg Popovich more than those absolutely (chuckle) painful moments for the reporters on the sideline.
Gregg Popovich. Doris Burke: I adore Gregg. Listen, I don’t like those [courtside] interviews more than anybody else, but I tell a story about Pop that will capture him. He loses Game 7 [of the 2013 NBA Finals]. I’m walking out of Miami Arena, and he’s gonna cross paths with me. I don’t even want to make eye contact with him. I put my head down and I step back and allow him to pass. And he grabs my shoulders and he turns me to him and he says, “Now what are you gonna do with your offseason?” I’m stunned, and I said, “I’m actually gonna make a trip to Napa.” He goes, “Doris, here’s my secretary’s email. You send her a note, tell her what you’re doing.” He sent me an email back with a list of places I should go. That captures Gregg Popovich more than those absolutely (chuckle) painful moments for the reporters on the sideline.
J. Michael Falgoust: NBA coaches just completed conference call, a league source tells @IndyStarSports, & they’ll pursue what’s being called Racial Justice Reform led by Lloyd Pierce (Hawks). Includes Popovich (Spurs), Snyder (Jazz), Kerr (GSW). They’ll seek to connect w/grassroots groups in communities, I’m told, such as meeting with mayors, police, etc. The goal: Be a bridge to create better communication, link up with groups that are about action and ultimately create change.
NBCA executive director Dave Fogel and president Rick Carlisle have concerns that several assistants and three head coaches — Houston’s Mike D’Antoni (69 years old), New Orleans’ Alvin Gentry (65) and San Antonio’s Gregg Popovich (71) — could be restricted from leading their teams and some could face considerable challenges in resuming their careers.
“Pop,” as he’s known, is very private, but he finally agreed to pop off on a phone call. He wouldn’t pose for a picture, however, explaining that he should not be the focus. He has spent 25 years in a dialogue about race with his teams. He took players to see “Hamilton” on Broadway, Ava DuVernay in L.A., the African-American Museum in D.C. and the National Civil Rights Museum in Memphis. He gave players copies of “Between the World and Me,” by Ta-Nehisi Coates.
“Especially if you’re a white coach and you’re coaching a group that’s largely black, you’d better gain their trust, you’d better be genuine, you’d better understand their situation,” he tells me. “You’d better understand where they grew up. Maybe there’s a black kid from a prep school. Maybe there’s another black kid who saw his first murder when he was 7 years old.”
One of the significant factors in establishing risk for health complications due to the coronavirus is advanced age, which leaves three head coaches among those in the league’s 22-team July restart — New Orleans’ Alvin Gentry (65), Houston’s Mike D’Antoni (69) and San Antonio’s Gregg Popovich (71) — perhaps vulnerable to recommendations of those evaluations, sources said.
Limitations to D’Antoni, Gentry and Popovich could leave their three teams at a significant competitive disadvantage in Orlando. Executives with the three franchises — and elders of the National Basketball Coaches Association — have been in consistent contact with the league office on the matter, sources said. D’Antoni and Gentry have been publicly and privately frustrated with the possibility that they could be left off the team’s bench — or even left out of the bubble — and fear a decision to limit or omit them could become death knells to their careers.
With the next NBA season not expected to start until at least Dec. 1, that calls into some serious question whether that could overlap with Olympic qualifying tournaments that some nations will need to endure in June 2021 and the Tokyo Games themselves the following month. And Kerr, who is slated to be an assistant under San Antonio’s Gregg Popovich for USA Basketball in Tokyo, said Tuesday that he doesn’t have any idea how the schedule will work. “Believe it or not, I haven’t had a single conversation with Pop about that,” Kerr said. “And the reason is because we don’t know. We’ve been talking almost daily now for the last couple of weeks and before that we were speaking once every few weeks. So, we haven’t even had a single conversation because there’s nothing to report.”
The Players Coalition has gathered the signatures of more than 1,400 current and retired athletes, coaches, general managers and staff members from the NFL, NBA and Major League Baseball, including on a letter to the United States Congress supporting a bill to end qualified immunity, which makes it difficult to sue police officers for brutality. Among the prominent athletes and coaches who signed the letter are Tom Brady, Drew Brees, Carson Wentz, Dak Prescott, Myles Garrett, Alex Bregman, CC Sabathia, Steve Kerr and Gregg Popovich. U.S. Representatives Justin Amash, L-Michigan, and Ayanna Pressley, D-Massachusetts, introduced the bill June 4, seeking to eliminate the doctrine of qualified immunity and give Americans a better chance to hold police and other public officials accountable in court, when the citizens believe their constitutional rights are violated.
San Antonio Spurs coach Gregg Popovich said the “country is in trouble” and he’s “embarrassed as a white person” to know that George Floyd could die in such a horrific way as a police officer with a knee on Floyd’s neck went about his job in such a “nonchalant … casual” manner. “In a strange, counterintuitive sort of way, the best teaching moment of this recent tragedy, I think, was the look on the officer’s face,” Popovich said in an emotional video released by the Spurs as part of their #SpursVoices series on social media. “For white people to see how nonchalant, how casual, just how everyday-going-about-his job, so much so that he could just put his left hand in his pocket, wriggle his knee around a little bit to teach this person some sort of a lesson — and that it was his right and his duty to do it, in his mind.
1 month ago via ESPN
Popovich, 71, said it’s up to white people to step up — “no matter what the consequences” — and help lead the charge for change. “We have to do it. Black people have been shouldering this burden for 400 years,” Popovich said. “The only reason this nation has made the progress it has is because of the persistence, patience and effort of black people. The history of our nation from the very beginning in many ways was a lie, and we continue to this day, mostly black and brown people, to try to make that lie a truth so that it is no longer a lie. And those rights and privileges are enjoyed by people of color, just like we enjoy them. So it’s got to be us, in my opinion, that speak truth to power, and call it out, no matter what the consequences. We have to speak. We have to not let anything go.”
1 month ago via ESPN
Steve Kerr: This is why he is Pop. As he once told me- ‘life is short- you either stand for something or you don’t.’ He has always firmly stood for justice and equality, and given the rest of us the courage to do so too.

Storyline: Popovich-Kerr Dynamic
Late last night my phone rang, and it was Coach Pop. He was ready to say something. “The thing that strikes me is that we all see this police violence and racism, and we’ve seen it all before, but nothing changes. That’s why these protests have been so explosive. But without leadership and an understanding of what the problem is, there will never be change. And white Americans have avoided reckoning with this problem forever, because it’s been our privilege to be able to avoid it. That also has to change.”
The question of leadership clearly is weighing heavily on Popovich’s mind. At this critical moment, he is feeling despair over what he sees as a leadership void in the White House. “It’s unbelievable. If Trump had a brain, even if it was 99 percent cynical, he would come out and say something to unify people. But he doesn’t care about bringing people together. Even now. That’s how deranged he is. It’s all about him. It’s all about what benefits him personally. It’s never about the greater good. And that’s all he’s ever been.”
Gregg Popovich: “It’s so clear what needs to be done. We need a president to come out and say simply that ‘black lives matter.’ Just say those three words. But he won’t and he can’t. He can’t because it’s more important to him to mollify the small group of followers who validate his insanity. But it’s more than just Trump. The system has to change. I’ll do whatever I can do to help, because that’s what leaders do. But he can’t do anything to put us on a positive path, because he’s not a leader.
Gregg Popovich: “It’s like what Lindsay Graham and Ted Cruz used to say when they had the courage to say it: He’s unfit. But they have chosen instead to be invisible and obsequious in the face of this carnage. In the end, what we have is a fool in place of a president, while the person who really runs the country, Senator Mitch McConnell, destroys the United States for generations to come. McConnell has destroyed and degraded our judicial system. He has tried to destroy heath care. He’s destroyed the environment. He’s the master and Trump’s the stooge, and what’s funny is that Trump doesn’t even know it. Trump’s always wanted to be part of the in-group, but McConnell is an in-group of one and Trump plays the fool.”
In describing recent events of “police brutality, racial profiling and the weaponization of racism” as “shameful, inhumane and intolerable,” the National Basketball Coaches Association has established a committee on racial injustice and reform to pursue solutions within NBA cities. Gregg Popovich, Steve Kerr, Lloyd Pierce, David Fizdale and Stan Van Gundy — some of the profession’s most thoughtful and consistent voices on social issues in the sport — were among the coaches selected to a committee that helped craft a forcefully worded denouncement of the George Floyd killing in Minneapolis and the greater pattern of violence and intolerance toward African Americans in the United States.
On playing for coach Gregg Popovich. Jakob Poeltl: “I was really excited about that, when I found out I was going to play for the Spurs, to get a chance to play for Pop. I think over the past few years I’ve really learned a lot from him about the mental side of basketball and how to approach the game. He’s really taught me that, in that aspect. Besides that, he’s a really good guy. He’s a guy you can talk to and joke around with. I really enjoy having him as my coach.”

Doc Rivers sets record straigh on Tim Duncan recruitment

Rivers cleared up the story saying Duncan affirmed to him he was set to join but had to speak with Gregg Popovich first. That meeting with Popovich ultimately ended any chance at Duncan joining Orlando. “That story isn’t told correctly because it’s true we talked about it and I actually told him absolutely families can fly not all the time but families can fly every once in a while. That story is not told correctly,” Rivers said. Said Rivers: “As a matter of fact what I remember the most about that was Tim Duncan looked at me and said, ‘I’m pretty sure that I’m actually coming to the Magic. I just need to go back to San Antonio because I love Pop and I want to have my last meeting with Pop.'”