James Capers Rumors

Kentavious Caldwell-Pope came into Game 6 focused on not losing sight of Robinson, a rookie who is already one of the best players in the league at moving without the ball. Of course, the game got chippy. “You ain’t nothing,” Caldwell-Pope shouted at Robinson with 2:50 left in the half while Miami’s Bam Adebayo was at the free-throw line. Referee James Capers warned Caldwell-Pope to cool it down and he replied, “He’s the one talking sh–. He ain’t getting nothing tonight.”
After the game, the league began its investigation of Tucker’s headbutt by having NBA security question him, a source told ESPN. “A screen action at the perimeter occurred as Schroder attempted to get through the screen, delivers an unnecessary and excessive act in the groin of Tucker,” crew chief James Capers explained after the game via a pool report. “Tucker gets up and head-butts Schroder. The action of Schroder is a Flagrant Penalty 2. The action of Tucker is an automatic ejection technical foul. “What led us to replay was a hostile act situation,” Capers said. “So, when we went there, we got the play right.”
In the bubble, referees have had to rethink some of their approaches to the job. What do you do when you hear a foul you didn’t necessarily see? What is it like knowing that the viewing audience can hear your explanation of every call in real time? And how much slack do you give during those on-court confrontations that are suddenly under a larger microscope? “It’s been an unusual experience, and nothing we could ever dream of,” said 26-year referee James Capers, one of the league’s most veteran officials. “It’s so unusual of a circumstance that I’m trying to take it one day at a time and just make the best out of it.”
While there may be the occasional moment when a referee will hear something that helps confirm whether a play was a foul, officials are mostly relying on the typical things. “I’m so locked in that [it doesn’t impact me],” Capers said. “We have a principle to referee the defender. So when that reach happens, I know if it’s hand and ball, and I know that it’s wrist, and I know if he gets him. Because, people don’t talk about it, but basketball is a contact sport. We’re trying to figure out if it is marginal and incidental, versus illegal. So as long as I am locked in, and as long as I am doing my job and focused, I see it the same way.”
In the bubble, referees have had to rethink some of their approaches to the job. What do you do when you hear a foul you didn’t necessarily see? What is it like knowing that the viewing audience can hear your explanation of every call in real time? And how much rope do you give during those on-court confrontations that are suddenly under a larger microscope? “It’s been an unusual experience, and nothing we could ever dream of,” said 26-year referee James Capers, one of the league’s most veteran officials. “It’s so unusual of a circumstance that I’m trying to take it one day at a time and just make the best out of it.”