Jenny Boucek Rumors

And after Carlisle and Mavericks assistant Jenny Boucek finished the question-and-answer session, covering topics sports specialization to creativity versus structure to practice planning, he discussed another strategy. It’s one specific to his instruction in Dallas: Luka Doncic’s offseason conditioning as the 20-year-old aims to build on his Rookie of the Year debut season.
Hammon, the first female full-time assistant coach in NBA history, was briefly the only women assistant coach with Nancy Lieberman (2015-17) and Boucek (2017-present), but in the last couple seasons, there has been a clear jump. That should only continue, which comforts Toliver. “It’s progress. Certainly, if they’re qualified for the job, they should have the job. Obviously, other franchises are recognizing the benefit of women on their staffs and I think it’s great.”
Women are a becoming a bigger part of the league now than ever before. The hires of Toliver and Melvin were not overlooked; it just no longer seems like such an unusual thing to bring a woman into the fray of an NBA club, probably because the likes of San Antonio assistant Becky Hammon, former Sacramento assistant Nancy Lieberman, Dallas assistant Jenny Boucek, Clippers G League assistant Natalie Nakase and Memphis analyst Nicki Gross took care of the first wave of trailblazing. “I think it’s great and I think it’s great for the NBA,” said Charlotte’s James Borrego, the league’s first Hispanic full-time coach. “It speaks to our league, the diversity, the openness, the inclusion and I’m proud to be part of that, part of a league that’s open to that. I’ve been around Becky Hammon for a number of years now. These are bright women that belong in our league.”
Jenny Boucek made history this summer when she was hired by the Dallas Mavericks to be an assistant to the team’s basketball staff and special projects, making her the first female to join the team’s coaching staff in franchise history. And so far, it has gotten off to a good start. “This is a high-character bunch, all the way from the leadership to the players,” Boucek said. “I think we’re on the verge of really turning the corner here and getting back into winning-mode. We have the character to have sustainable success here.”
Earlier this week, a report following a seven-month long investigation confirmed multiple instances of sexual harassment and improper conduct on the business side of the Mavericks franchise. “I would never have known,” Boucek said. “From my interactions here over the years, I absolutely would have never known because everyone has been not just appropriate, but above and beyond respectful.”
On Feb. 3 in Sacramento before an otherwise unremarkable Mavericks-Kings game, Jenny Boucek, a Sacramento Kings assistant coach, strode across the court toward Rick Carlisle, the Dallas Mavericks head coach, for what Carlisle assumed would be a typical pregame chat. The two are friends; Boucek, an inaugural WNBA player and longtime assistant and head coach in that league, had spent parts of the 2011 and 2014 WNBA offseasons visiting the Mavericks — including for a full month of the team’s 2014 training camp. “There’s something I’ve got to tell you,” Boucek said. It was something she had told very few people, and almost no one in the NBA. “I’m pregnant,” Boucek, now 44, divulged. She was due in the summer.
1 year ago via ESPN