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Junior Bridgeman Rumors

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Former NBA forward Ulysses “Junior” Bridgeman is the new owner of legacy Black media company Ebony after bidding $14 million for it in U.S. Bankruptcy Court. His company, Bridgeman Sports and Media, was announced as the successful bidder for Ebony Media’s assets by a Houston bankruptcy court in December. With the purchase, Bridgeman becomes the latest athlete with ownership in a media company.
Former NBA player Ulysses “Junior” Bridgeman has emerged as the likely next owner of legacy Black media company Ebony, after bidding $14 million for it in U.S. Bankruptcy Court. Bridgeman Sports and Media, a company owned by the retired Milwaukee Bucks forward, was announced as the successful bidder for Ebony Media’s assets by a Houston bankruptcy court Friday.
In 2019, Bridgeman dropped efforts to buy Sports Illustrated from Meredith, which subsequently sold the magazine to Authentic Brands Group for $110 million. Growing up in East Chicago, Bridgeman said he viewed Johnson Publishing’s former headquarters at 820 S. Michigan Ave. with a sense of pride on his visits to Chicago. “Ebony kind of stood for Black excellence, showing people doing positive things that could benefit everyone,” Bridgeman said. “It just made you feel good knowing that’s where they’re publishing all the stories in the magazine.”
Today, Junior’s net worth is an estimated $600 million, and he is listed as the second wealthiest NBA player behind none other than Michael Jordan. Money is not everything, yes, but in today’s climate, it’s necessary to detail how a man from humble beginnings in Indiana obtained a heightened level of success without a major shoe deal, making no more than $350,000 in any of his 12 NBA seasons playing for the Milwaukee Bucks and Los Angeles Clippers. Don’t get it confused: Junior was no slouch on the court. At 6-5 and with a silky-smooth jumper, he was a back-to-back Missouri Valley Player of the Year, reached the Final Four at Louisville, was drafted No. 8 overall in the 1975 NBA draft and was one of the best sixth men of his era. His No. 2 jersey is raised in the rafters of the Milwaukee Bucks’ arena.