Rick Carlisle Rumors

The Coliseum Arena is now called Oracle Arena, but the Warriors will exit the facility after the 2018-19 for the new Chase Center in San Francisco. According to Rick Carlisle, president of the NBA Coaches Association, Moe, 79, was the “godfather of the modern NBA-paced game because he is the guy who really saw this coming.”
In early 2001, Suns owner Jerry Colangelo approached then-commissioner David Stern at a meeting in New York with what he felt were urgent concerns for the league. The average score of an NBA game had dropped precipitously to its lowest point since 1955 (the 1998-99 lockout-shortened season excluded). The league was shooting 44.3 percent from the field, the lowest mark since 1969 (again, save 1998-99). “The game was getting very physical and bordering on truly ugly at times because of the amount of contact and banging,” Dallas Mavericks coach Rick Carlisle says. “There was a need for change.”
4 weeks ago via ESPN
Suddenly, a slow pace became evidence that a team was out of touch with the “smart” way to play. Pace has increased in nine of the past 14 seasons, and the rate of change has been, well, fastest over the past six. In that span, pace has jumped 9.6 percent, putting the league in territory not seen since the early 1990s. Suddenly, it’s the slow-paced teams that are considered dinosaurs. Pace and space, with the latter referring to the room opened by additional 3-point shooters, are the order of the day. D’Antoni was feted as a visionary when Morey invited him to serve as a featured speaker at the 2015 MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference. “Over time, analytics became more prevalent,” Carlisle says. “The potency of the 3-point shot became not only something that was a trend but a reality and a necessity. If you want to get a lot of quality looks at 3s, the answer is to play fast.”
4 weeks ago via ESPN
In early 2001, Suns owner Jerry Colangelo approached then-commissioner David Stern at a meeting in New York with what he felt were urgent concerns for the league. The average score of an NBA game had dropped precipitously to its lowest point since 1955 (the 1998-99 lockout-shortened season excluded). The league was shooting 44.3 percent from the field, the lowest mark since 1969 (again, save 1998-99). “The game was getting very physical and bordering on truly ugly at times because of the amount of contact and banging,” Dallas Mavericks coach Rick Carlisle says. “There was a need for change.”
4 weeks ago via ESPN
“A lot of the slowing down of the game had been the result of stringent illegal defense rules,” says Carlisle, whose first season as a head coach, with the Detroit Pistons, coincided with the reforms. “The [defensive three-seconds rule] was a major step toward the game that we have today. Ball movement and creating offensive scrambles for open shots was becoming more of the norm than posting up a great player, having him back in, drawing a double-team.” In the ’90s, the post-up had been a central feature of many NBA offenses. Carlisle noted that one of the enduring images for him of the late ’90s, when he was an assistant coach with the Indiana Pacers, was watching Mark Jackson deliberately back down New York Knicks guard Charlie Ward, who would squat in a defensive stance that looked like something out of pro football.
4 weeks ago via ESPN