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Rick Sund Rumors

The 3-point weapon he possesses wasn’t always in his arsenal. In fact, the big man said he never desired it to be a part of his game. He had to be nudged into the possibility, and the nudging began as early as his second year in the league by former Atlanta Hawks general manager Rick Sund, who is now the senior adviser of basketball operations for the Hawks. “Rick is the one that told me, ‘Man, you have a really good mid-range. You should start shooting corner threes, that’s going to help extend your career,’” Horford told Yahoo Sports as he was leaving Chase Center after practice Saturday. “I used to be a banger down low and posting up. He was like, ‘Man, you’re not going to last in this league if you keep playing like that.’ Rick Sund was the first to tell me.”
“Rick is the one that told me, ‘Man, you have a really good mid-range. You should start shooting corner threes, that’s going to help extend your career,’” Horford told Yahoo Sports as he was leaving Chase Center after practice Saturday. “I used to be a banger down low and posting up. He was like, ‘Man, you’re not going to last in this league if you keep playing like that.’ Rick Sund was the first to tell me.”
Sund saw something in Horford that many hadn’t realized yet. “I remember our conversation very well. We were discussing if he’d be more suited as a four-man or a five,” Sund told Yahoo Sports via phone. “I believed and relayed that it would be to his advantage to develop into a stretch-five and draw guys away from the basket. I told him to work on that corner three and he’d really be an effective five-man. I also told him he’ll have a great opportunity to make the All-Star as a stretch-five. This is just what I saw.”
Not long before the 1984 NBA Draft, Rod Thorn received a phone call from the Mavericks. Dallas was about to make a serious play for Michael Jordan. Mavs general manager Rick Sund told Thorn, then the GM of the Bulls, he’d part with All-Star forward Mark Aguirre if Chicago was willing to give up the No. 3 pick, which the Bulls would use to draft Jordan. Sund figured this one had a chance. The Bulls were coming off a 27-win season, and Aguirre was a local hero who drew huge crowds while starring at DePaul. He was the No. 1 pick in the draft only three years before and was coming off of a season as the NBA’s second-leading scorer.
Sund had fallen in love with North Carolina’s recent teams and had dreams of pairing Jordan with his college teammate, Sam Perkins, who had also entered the ’84 draft. If he could finagle the third pick, he’d be able to do it. The Mavericks were already choosing fourth. So, as he puts it, he “dangled” Aguirre. But there was one problem: Thorn and the Bulls had been waiting a long time for this moment, and they weren’t exactly trying to flush it away. “(Rod and I) talked about this a couple weeks ago,” Sund told The Athletic. “And I said, ‘You know, Rod. You’d have won the press conference, but we’d have won NBA championships.’”