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Shawn Respert Rumors

Officially announced Monday, Joerger will lean on his coaching mentor (famed minor league coach Duane Ticknor), a longtime and well-respected NBA assistant (Elston Turner), a holdover from the Lionel Hollins regime (Bob Thornton) and an up-and-coming young coach (Shawn Respert). The Griz also announced the addition of Chattin Hill as athletic performance coach and hired Mark Sanford as assistant video coordinator/player development. Jason March, video coordinator for several seasons, was promoted to advance scout. March’s former assistant Steve Jones moves in to the role as video coordinator/player development.
How far away do you think you are from getting an opportunity to be a head coach? Shawn Respert: You know what? Not far away. I don’t think any young coach could ask for a better coaching staff that I came into. All of them are former NBA players: Adelman, Terry Porter, TR Dunn, Jack Sikma and then in Houston we had Elston Turner. All I had to do was just sit back and keep my mouth shut, listen and learn. After almost six years of working with a staff like that in the NBA, I’m sure I’m ready for a head coaching job for a college level or maybe a D-League opportunity. The NBA? Let’s say maybe five years. Then I’ll be ready to do something in the NBA and lead a team.
Do you think Derrick Williams can become an efficient post player? Shawn Respert: I think he can be very effective. He’s not going to be a traditional post player like the ones you and I grew up watching. In the 80’s and the 90’s there were a lot of great post players who played with their backs to the basket. Derrick is kind of a new way of a post player who uses more face-up game, that posts up off the block, attacks with one or two dribbles… He does have to develop some type of a back-to-the-basket comfort level and gain confidence. What’s most remarklable about Ricky Rubio, even at his age, is how he plays like an aggressive, confident, veteran ball player. When Derrick Williams learns that, we’ll see a lot of improvement. He has all the physical tools.
The Wolves assigned Respert to work with Williams every day after practice, both in the film room and on the court. But the most important challenge for Respert was reaching Williams on an emotional level to spur the kind of growth in his mental toughness that the team saw as the primary problem getting in the way of his development. ”Even watching him in timeouts, he was so frustrated, like a young man who was insecure about ‘Is this where he is supposed to be?”’ Respert said. ”I saw him get so frustrated where he started to tear up and his eyes started to water because he has no answer to fix this problem that he has.”