Steve Kerr Rumors

While they often present a hell for opponents, opposing scouts love sharing an arena with the Warriors. “Easiest night of my life,” a Western Conference scout says of watching the champs. This is because so much of what the Warriors do is “flow” offense, an amalgam of transition pushes, applied basic principles and high-level improvisation. As Andre Iguodala is fond of saying, “The hardest offense to stop is random offense.” When the Warriors do call plays, fans might be in for an amusing sight. On occasion, Steve Kerr signals for a call entitled, “What the fuck?” a play that dates back to the Phil Jackson’s Bulls years. When giving the sign for this, Kerr does an exaggerated nonchalant shrug, plus a facial expression of mock confusion. An onlooker might wonder if Kerr has just given up or doesn’t care. Indeed it’s the opposite. That look of bewildered withdrawal means the Warriors are imposing more structure than usual.
Now, it’s safe to say Kerr’s Warriors are doing just fine. But would he give any of the ATP World Tour’s players a shot? “Gosh. I might go with Djokovic,” Kerr said. “I think he can guard anybody. He moves his feet extremely well. Side to side, I think he can stay in front of anybody. I think he’d be good in the fast break. I’d like to see him on a basketball court.”
And, as Kerr says, there are some similarities between basketball and tennis that he appreciates. “The movement is very similar. It’s one of the reasons I loved playing tennis. I can’t do it anymore, because my knees don’t hold up, but I loved playing for years after I retired because the movements were all very similar,” Kerr said. “You’re chasing a ball, you’re down in a crouch. A defensive stance in basketball is the same position you’d be in in tennis, getting ready for your next shot. Lateral movements, up and back, jumping up to hit a lob, whatever.”
Burke accepted the award during an evening ceremony at the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, Massachusetts. She was honored, along with photographer Andy Bernstein, for making a “significant contribution to the game of basketball.” “To the players and the coaches of the NBA — Rick Carlisle, LeBron James, Steve Kerr, Chris Paul, and many many others,” Burke said, “your private words of support to me, and your public statements of support of my work, went far beyond what you could imagine. And the confidence that I had to do the job ESPN has given me.”
2 weeks ago via ESPN
In accepting the Curt Gowdy Media Award on Thursday, Doris Burke made a point of thanking players and coaches including LeBron James and Steve Kerr for encouraging her on the road to becoming a highly respected NBA analyst. Burke accepted the award during an evening ceremony at the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, Massachusetts. She was honored, along with photographer Andy Bernstein, for making a “significant contribution to the game of basketball.” “To the players and the coaches of the NBA — Rick Carlisle, LeBron James, Steve Kerr, Chris Paul, and many many others,” Burke said, “your private words of support to me, and your public statements of support of my work, went far beyond what you could imagine. And the confidence that I had to do the job ESPN has given me.”
2 weeks ago via ESPN