Tiny Archibald Rumors

Six times per year over the last three years, the NBPA has staged these screenings around the country at teams’ arenas and practice facilities. They are free of charge, and Rogowski said more than 500 ex-players have participated. According to an ESPN.com report, these examinations have revealed that 20 percent of those older than 60 had diabetes, more than 30 percent were obese and more than 35 percent of those between 40 and 59 had high blood pressure. They have also saved at least one life. Hall of Fame guard Tiny Archibald — a contemporary of Malone, Jones and Dawkins — was found in 2016 to be in need of a heart transplant, which he has since received.
Rogowski and the NBPA’s efforts saved the life of Hall of Famer Nate “Tiny” Archibald. “He came to this screening in New York City two years ago. After having gone through the screening, we were able to detect a heart abnormality that he was able to get surgery on and a heart transplant. He’s very thankful for the program, because he didn’t know that he had this issue.”
Storyline: Tiny Archibald Health
On June 22, 2018, Dr. Koji Takeda performed the successful transplant. Two days afterward, Tiny astonished doctors by walking a quarter mile on the treadmill. Six months later, there is no trace of HIV in his heart. His recovery was remarkable, yet Archibald remained in the hospital for an additional 26 days undergoing rehab. On July 4, he sat by his window, watching the sailboats, shifting uncomfortably as the pain in his right side worsened. The morning nurse walked in to help him wash up. “Are you ready, Mr. Archibald?” she asked. “Yes,” Tiny answered, “except I can’t get up.”
2 years ago via ESPN
Storyline: Tiny Archibald Health
“The (retired) players association saved my life,” he says. He was there when legends Oscar Robertson, Dave Bing, Dave Cowens and others fought to get retired players benefits. He will be forever grateful to the current leadership of the union, which includes Chris Paul, Dwyane Wade and LeBron James, for setting aside the funds to make sure every retired player with a minimum of three years of service can be screened.
2 years ago via ESPN