ABC/ESPN’s highly anticipated 10-part Michael Jordan documentary, “The Last Dance,” is being moved up to April, The Post has learned. Sources said the start date will be Sunday, April 19. It was originally slated for June. ABC/ESPN plans to make an announcement on “Good Morning America” on Tuesday, according to sources.
In a recent interview with NBC Sports Boston’s Brian Scalabrine, Ainge detailed his relationship with Jordan and spoke of a time that the two golfed together ahead of the Celtics-Bulls playoff series in 1986. Here’s a look at that interview, per the Celtics on NBC Sports Boston’s Twitter account. “This is the only time ever in my entire career that I had dinner, lunch did anything with an opponent,” Ainge said of the meeting with Jordan. “But with Michael, Michael loved golf and I loved golf and Michael reached out and wanted to know where he could find a golf course and maybe get on a golf course to play in Boston on their two off days. So, I think we arranged to play 36 at Framingham Country Club.”
Ainge also called Jordan “one competitive son of a gun”, a fact well-known to anyone who saw Jordan compete during his playing days. Nobody will blame Ainge for spending time with Jordan on a day off. After all, the Celtics were still able to sweep the Bulls in the series even despite Jordan averaging a whopping 43.7 points per game. So, it doesn’t seem like either side picked up many tips and tricks about how to slow the other down.
With players stuck at home, their respective teams are having to get creative to minimize the drop-off in conditioning that a potential monthslong layoff presents. The Chicago Bulls acted fast, sending out a workout plan to their players on the second day after the league suspended the season. “Our strength and conditioning coach sent us a little program that has different types of lunges, different types of pushups and you do it at a high volume to get a little sweat going,” Bulls second-year center Wendell Carter Jr. said. “Nothing that anybody else can’t do.”
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In one of his recent interviews, Pippen said a back injury he suffered at the end of his rookie year came in as a blessing in disguise. Pippen understood that playing in the NBA, apart from being physically fit, also demands a sharp mind and readiness in every possible aspect. Guidance from some of his older teammates helped him in understanding that even though he is young, he should take care of any potential injuries that could affect him performing on a high level. “Probably the best thing that happened to me was that I hurt my back after my first year in the league because it really put me in a position to focus on the physical aspect of how to survive in this game and how I would survive as a player with a bad back. It was a big challenge for me. I feel like I met that challenge, surviving 16 years of hard playing. Those things that I dealt with early on in my career definitely prepared me for learning and getting better.”