But if a guy [Hassan Whiteside] is a 7-footer, and motivated to serve as a rim-roller and a rim-protector and has some offensive game and isn’t a complete jerk and can be melded into the salary cap? He’s still got a place. And yes, if certain “sweeteners” were part of the deal, the Mavericks, I’m told by NBA people close to the situation, could still have a place for him. The Mavs themselves cannot say this, of course; his contract is property of another team, and announcing interest is tantamount to tampering. But the Mavs can and do scout players, all of the players, as all teams do. And I’ll give you an “educated guess” that their opinion of Whiteside, at the right cost, mirrors Whiteside’s opinion of himself.
In early 2001, Suns owner Jerry Colangelo approached then-commissioner David Stern at a meeting in New York with what he felt were urgent concerns for the league. The average score of an NBA game had dropped precipitously to its lowest point since 1955 (the 1998-99 lockout-shortened season excluded). The league was shooting 44.3 percent from the field, the lowest mark since 1969 (again, save 1998-99). “The game was getting very physical and bordering on truly ugly at times because of the amount of contact and banging,” Dallas Mavericks coach Rick Carlisle says. “There was a need for change.”
2 days ago via ESPN
Suddenly, a slow pace became evidence that a team was out of touch with the “smart” way to play. Pace has increased in nine of the past 14 seasons, and the rate of change has been, well, fastest over the past six. In that span, pace has jumped 9.6 percent, putting the league in territory not seen since the early 1990s. Suddenly, it’s the slow-paced teams that are considered dinosaurs. Pace and space, with the latter referring to the room opened by additional 3-point shooters, are the order of the day. D’Antoni was feted as a visionary when Morey invited him to serve as a featured speaker at the 2015 MIT Sloan Sports Analytics Conference. “Over time, analytics became more prevalent,” Carlisle says. “The potency of the 3-point shot became not only something that was a trend but a reality and a necessity. If you want to get a lot of quality looks at 3s, the answer is to play fast.”
2 days ago via ESPN
In early 2001, Suns owner Jerry Colangelo approached then-commissioner David Stern at a meeting in New York with what he felt were urgent concerns for the league. The average score of an NBA game had dropped precipitously to its lowest point since 1955 (the 1998-99 lockout-shortened season excluded). The league was shooting 44.3 percent from the field, the lowest mark since 1969 (again, save 1998-99). “The game was getting very physical and bordering on truly ugly at times because of the amount of contact and banging,” Dallas Mavericks coach Rick Carlisle says. “There was a need for change.”
3 days ago via ESPN