Victor Oladipo's remaining salary in dispute

Indiana Pacers star Victor Oladipo is in an unresolved situation over $3 million in salary, multiple sources told ESPN. Under the rules the NBA established for its season restart in Orlando, players who were healthy but opted not to play would have to forgo their remaining salary for the season. Two weeks ago, in an interview with The Athletic, Oladipo said he was healthy but had decided not to play to ensure recovery from tearing his quad tendon in January 2019.
In the days since, lawyers from the player’s union and the NBA have reviewed the situation and there is dispute over where Oladipo’s situation falls. The union believes Oladipo, who went to Orlando with the Pacers and then cleared quarantine so he could practice, should be paid his remaining salary, sources said. The league, largely in an effort to set a precedent in case other players who are deemed healthy want to leave Orlando and no longer play, believes Oladipo has opted out and should not be paid, sources said. His public comments about feeling healthy has only solidified the league’s position on the matter, sources said. The Pacers support Oladipo’s decision and are willing to pay him the salary whether he plays or not, sources said.
Bryant soon called him to talk basketball, with the “Black Mamba” breaking down film with him. Bryant showed him why he considered Larry Bird the sport’s greatest pump-faker – to the delight of the Celtics fan in Chopra. That would lead to a long and often arduous collaboration that would become the well-regarded “Kobe Bryant’s Muse” that debuted on Showtime in 2015. It recounted Bryant’s long journey back from injury while delving into his motivations and controversies. “That project over the course of two years, as it intensified, I got to know him and his family and his story,” Chopra said.
Once the NBA resumes its season in a controlled environment, players will have more to worry about than winning. They will have varying concerns about how the resumed season could affect their mental health. Boston Celtics forward Gordon Hayward will be away from his pregnant wife, Robyn, and children until she is due to give birth sometime in September. “It’s definitely a stressful time for us,” said Hayward, whose wife and children are moving to Indianapolis to be near family while he is with the Celtics as part of the NBA’s 2019-20 restart at the ESPN Disney Wide World of Sports Complex near Orlando.
Turner’s father, David, contracted the COVID-19 virus and was quarantined in a bedroom in the family home in Dallas for about 10 days. He’s doing well now according to Myles, but the episode had an obvious impact on his feelings toward going back to basketball when the number of cases of infected people continues to rise. Turner moved back into his parents’ house when he returned to Texas after the season was put on hold. His father hadn’t been feeling well and was discovered to have the virus the second time he was tested. “I saw it firsthand and how it affected my family and I couldn’t imagine how it’s affected other families,” Turner said Friday during a Zoom call with media members. “I definitely wasn’t a big proponent of playing at first. I still have questions now, but most of the questions have been answered.”
Storyline: Coronavirus
“The world will be watching,” President of Basketball Operations Kevin Pritchard said Tuesday in a 40-minute Zoom conference with media members. “We’re probably going to have some of the highest TV ratings we’ve ever had. I can feel in the air there’s a pent-up demand for our sport, and sports in general. “You go from apprehension on one end of the pendulum to excitement at the other end,” Pritchard added. “(We’re) getting excited to go play basketball and we look at this as a unique experience. I’m hopeful this is the only one we ever have to do.”
Storyline: TV Ratings

Storyline: Orlando Bubble
“I really want to play, and as a competitor and teammate this is tearing me apart,” Oladipo told The Athletic. “I feel like I’m at a great place in my rehab and getting closer and closer to 100 percent. With all the variables, from how I have to build my 5-on-5 workload back up, to the increased risk of a soft tissue injury which could delay my rehab, and the unknown exact set up of the bubble, I just can’t get my mind to being fully comfortable in playing. I have to be smart and this decision hasn’t been easy, but I truly believe continuing on the course I’m on and getting fully healthy for the 2020-21 season is the right decision for me.”
Oladipo has spent the past three months training with his physical therapist, Luke Miller. “Vic looks great and feels great and is in the best shape he’s ever been in,” Miller said. “He hasn’t had a setback at all. Now it’s about him taking everything into account, close this 2019-20 chapter and focus on 2020-21, which I believe will be a big one. He’s extremely close to the old VO, but he’s not there yet and he knows the work to get back there.
“He’s a very smart guy, and he’s asked several different doctors and physicians across the country, mentors and former basketball players he looks up to. We treated these past three months as if he was going to come back, so he kept everything high intensity-wise. “We told him from the start that he wouldn’t be 100 percent right away. It takes guys a good two years. It takes two years before you wake up in the morning and say, ‘I didn’t have surgery.’ We’ve talked through this thing — we just forgot to factor in the pandemic. That’s where he is hitting the reset button and focus on 2020-21. That’s where his mindset is.”

Victor Oladipo not sure about playing

Indiana Pacers All-Star Victor Oladipo isn’t ready to commit to playing at the NBA restart in Orlando even though Wednesday is supposed to be the deadline for the 22 participating teams to declare their traveling list of 35. Except, league sources tell IndyStar, it’s not a firm deadline. “Nothing is locked in like a normal roster deadline,” one of the sources said.
Gansey’s short-term plan is to scout players from afar with the hope he and the Pacers can reach an agreement for next season, a conversation that may not happen until after the NBA playoffs in October. “I can look at some other G League players and players who were on (two-way contracts) this year,” Gansey said. “You know, there are guys who have played overseas and I can do some scouting on some of these college guys and guys who are going to enter the draft here pretty soon.”