Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is concerned that the anti-Semitic views spouted by former NBA player and activist Stephen Jackson, along with NFL player DeSean Jackson, can lead to what he fears most: “apathy to all forms of social justice,” which he dubbed the “Apatholypse.” As part of his columnist role at The Hollywood Reporter, the former Los Angeles Lakers and UCLA Bruins star center took both Jacksons to task, along with Big3 founder Ice Cube for his own insensitive social media threads, in a piece titled “Where is the Outrage Over Anti-Semitism in Sports and Hollywood?”
Abdul-Jabbar was quick to point out that while the apologies from DeSean Jackson and Stephen Jackson largely fell flat, the lack of condemnation from most others in sports and entertainment, compared to the rise in support of the Black Lives Matter movement, was troubling. “It’s a very troubling omen for the future of the Black Lives Matter movement, but so too is the shocking lack of massive indignation,” Abdul-Jabbar wrote. “Given the New Woke-fulness in Hollywood and the sports world, we expected more passionate public outrage. What we got was a shrug of meh-rage.”
The Los Angeles Lakers trio of LeBron James, Anthony Davis, and Quinn Cook tried to get some 2K action going to pass the time in the bubble, and the results turned out to be catastrophic. Things did not really go as planned, with the servers crashing even before they could get a game in. As it turns out, there were too many spectators on the feed, so the 2K servers were unable to cope.
The league’s first crack at sponsored entertainment for the players fell flat. On Saturday night, the NBA brought in three disc jockeys to spin records at poolside parties at each of the three Disney hotels housing players. Almost no one showed. “The first time I heard about the DJ thing was (Sunday),” Davis said. “Dwight (Howard) told me he was the only one there. I think, quite frankly, a lot of guys didn’t know about it. I know the NBA is trying to make this as comfortable as possible and as relaxing as possible for us, and just make everyone feel as home as possible.”
Storyline: Orlando Bubble
“I didn’t know what to decide: Should I have a social justice message or should I have my last name there? I just think my last name is something that is very important to me,” he said. “Also social justice as well. But just holding my family name and representing the name on the back to go through this process and my name and people who’ve been with me through my entire career to help me get to this point. While still kind of bringing up things that we can do for social injustice.”
“I actually didn’t go with a name on the back of my jersey,” James said on a video conference call with reporters. “It was no disrespect to the list that was handed out to all the players. I commend anyone that decides to put something on the back of their jersey. It’s just something that didn’t really seriously resonate with my mission, with my goal. “I would have loved to have a say-so on what would have went on the back of my jersey. I had a couple things in mind, but I wasn’t part of that process, which is OK. I’m absolutely OK with that. … I don’t need to have something on the back of my jersey for people to understand my mission or know what I’m about and what I’m here to do.”