Top Stories
“I’ve been on him about things I need from him,” Billups said. “I said, ‘Nurk, I know you are going to be a free agent, and I understand you have to have a great year. You need me for you to have a great year, and I need you for us to have a good year. We need each other, right?’ “I’m going to give him every opportunity to have a great year. Because if he has a great year, that means we are a pretty damn good team. Because he is a good player. But that means he has to be focused and be in shape. Because you are only going to play as many minutes as you are physically able. If you are out there tired, uh-uh, come on, gotta get you out. There are good players behind you.”
It is unclear exactly what Nurkic and his role will look like under Billups, but to hear Nurkic talk, Billups has given him a vision of being more involved on both ends. Billups has been careful not to publicly define roles, but in general, he has preached that the offense will include more ball movement. “I just want to feel wanted, and I think I just need more support, and what I mean by that is different playing style, more inside-out game, more chance,” Nurkic said. “More chance to be successful and the position where they put you in. It’s all about the coach and where they put you, and I think Chauncey has figured out that certain people are going to have one to three points less, but the team is going to be way more successful with ball movement and playing together and be more fun. Even at the defensive end.”
He shows love to the late hip-hop artist Tupac Shakur first, creating a black and white version of Shakur’s 1996 album “All Eyez on Me.” He also gave a nod to Biggie Smalls, better known as The Notorious B.I.G. Lillard recreated Smalls’ iconic “King of New York” image by Barron Claiborne in the video. Lillard then pays tribute to track athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos, who wore black gloves and raised their fists on the medal stand during the 1968 Summer Olympics to protest racial inequities in the United States.
Trail Blazer CJ McCollum, already with his own brand, has taken a big step deeper into Oregon wine, buying a 318-acre Willamette Valley property where he plans to develop a vineyard. McCollum and his wife, Elise, announced the move Tuesday in a news release. “As we explored the long-term vision of McCollum Heritage 91 and beyond, we truly craved enhancing our sense of place, which is represented by the acquisition of this beautiful property,” McCollum said.